Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine and BioMed Central.

Open Access Original research article

Association between self reported snoring, STOP questionnaire and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients submitted to ortophaedic surgery

Ahmet Ursavaş1*, Tahir Güven2, Funda Coskun1, Ercüment Ege1 and Aysun Yılmazlar2

Author Affiliations

1 Pulmonary Medicine Department, School of Medicine,, University of Uludag, Bursa, Turkey

2 Anesthesia Department, School of Medicine, University of Uludag, Bursa, Turkey

For all author emails, please log on.

Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine 2013, 8:3  doi:10.1186/2049-6958-8-3

Published: 18 January 2013

Abstract

Background

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase perioperative complications. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship among postoperative pulmonary complication, snoring and STOP questionnaire in patients with ortophaedic surgery.

Methods

1,406 consecutive records of patients who had undergone elective ortophaedic surgery during the period January 2005-December 2008 were investigated retrospectively. Demographic information, sleep symptoms, STOP questionnaire, comorbidities and outcome data were collected.

Results

There were 289 (20.5%) snorers and 1,117 (79.5%) non-snorers in the study group. There was no significant difference between snorer and non-snorer patients (p > 0.05) in the prevalence of pneumonia and respiratory failure. But in snorer patients the rate of postoperative atelectasis was significantly higher than in non-snorer group (p < 0.0001). The STOP Questionnaire was given to 1,406 patients and 147 (10.4%) out of them were classified at high risk of OSA. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of pneumonia and respiratory failure between low and high risk group (p > 0.05). However, in high risk patients the occurrence of postoperative atelectasis was significantly higher than in low risk group (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion

Postoperative atelectasis was significantly more prevalent in the high risk group according to STOP questionnaire.

Keywords:
Atelectasis; Obesity; Orthopedic surgery; Sleep apnea; STOP questionnaire